In the Field with Else

White Electric Wind After many moons of wandering over hill and dale, through snow and gale, she comes to a clearing in the woods where the orange glow of a fire crackles, the scent of apple smoked wood meets her nostrils. An old woman sits by the flames, the hood to her cloak resting on…

Fairy Tale Field Notes: Clever Else

10.05.18 Yellow Rythmic Sun To begin, a full transcript to Clever Else can be read here. Three worlds, lower, middle, upper, this tale traverses, starting in the confined bowels of the heroine’s, Else’s, father’s cellar where she’s dispatched to return with beer.  Have you ever been in a cellar?  When we’d go to Iran during…

What The Rose Did . . .

What the Rose did to the Cypress, A Persian Tale from The Brown Fairy Book, by Andrew Lang, [1904] Once upon a time a great king of the East, named Saman-lalposh, had three brave and clever sons—Tahmasp, Qamas, and Almas-ruh-baksh. One day, when the king was sitting in his hall of audience, his eldest son,…

Fairy Tale Charting

I’ve been studying astrology.  I began with tropical but shifted into sidereal placements and study of the 27 nakshatras (indian jyotish astrology) after comparing both my own charts and those of people I know . . . have found sidereal offers a closer picture and a deeper story, sort of zoomed in.  It positions information…

What’s In A Name? by Tenderfoot

A beautiful flower girl wandered through her mother’s gardens.  She wore a pink rose petal dress and delicate shoes made of acorns.  She had hair that was the color of gold.  Her name was Relaqwel. Sighing, Relaqwel thought of all the suitors who had come to win her hand in marriage.  Castle Tereteety was overflowing…

Norse Myth

The Norse Myths have been the subject of Tenderfoot’s study for the past eight weeks.  Using D’Aulaires Book of Norse Myths, Favorite Norse Myths retold by Mary Pope Osborne, and Roy Wilkinson’s The Norse Stories and Their Significance, I was able to come up with an enriching and interesting lesson block. The starting point was…